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Plodcast Ep. 47

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Howdy! Listen in to hear Pastor Wilson talk about the upcoming Revoice Conference, claiming the whole thing to be “counter productive in the extreme”. He plods on to review Joseph Sobran’s book, “Subtracting Christianity” and finishes things off with another look at Hamartano and Hamartia in Acts.

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Show Notes:

Revoice Conference:

  • A doctrine has developed in the Evangelical & Reformed wing of the Church saying that someone can have a gay identity and be a Christian provided that they live a celibate lifestyle
  • Their identity can be gay but their behavior in the bedroom cannot be gay
  • The problem is that people don’t see the connection between effeminacy in manner and what winds up happening sexually, don’t start something you cannot finish
  • This revoice conference saying that they want to minister to homosexuals by letting them keep everything they can possibly keep is extremely counter productive

Subtracting Christianity:

  • Written by Joseph Sobran
  • This book is a collection of Sobran’s columns
  • He is a very engaging writer, making you think deep
  • Some of his criticisms of Israel are silly
  • He does have a cockeyed view from what is going on in the east
  • However, he has a sane, healthy, and happy voice for traditional Christian values

Hamartano & Hamartia

  • Consider the book of Acts
  • Hamartano is used once in Acts, where it is rendered as offend (Acts 25:8)
  • Hamartia is used eight times in Acts, (Acts 2:38, 3:19, 5:31, 7:6, 10:43, 13:38, 22:16, 26:18
  • Apostolic preaching frequently included the topic of sin. The relative absence of sin in much of modern preaching is therefore a great mystery. Our theologians are still working on it