Duty & Work Bundle

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Christians first expressed these political truths under Caesars, kings, popes, and emperors. We need them in the age of presidents.

Leviathan is rising again, and the first weapon we must recover is the longstanding Christian tradition of resisting governmental overreach. Our bloated bureaucratic state would have been unrecognizable to the Founders, and our acquiescence to its encroachments on liberty would have infuriated them. But here is the point: our Leviathan would not have surprised them. They were well acquainted with the tendency of governments to turn tyrannical: “Eternal vigilance is the price we pay for liberty.”

In Slaying Leviathan , historian Glenn S. Sunshine surveys some of the stories and key elements of Christian political thought from Augustine to the Declaration of Independence. Specifically, the book introduces theories of limited government that were synthesized into a coherent political philosophy by John Locke. Locke, of course, influenced the American founders and was, like us, fighting against the spirit of Leviathan in his day. But his is only one of the many stories in this book.

 

Your household is not just a shelter from a war zone; it is the command center from where you launch your attacks. It's this vision of the world, with the Christian family at the heart, that modern parents desperately need to recover.

In this truly original book, C.R. Wiley shows that, although the family has become dislocated and pushed to the side by modern society, this wasn't always the case. At one time, the world was not seen as a random assortment of time and matter, but as an ordered whole—as a Cosmos.

Because people saw themselves as part of an ordered whole, they also believed that they had obligations to the people around them. They were not just autonomous individuals, but members of households with unique duties to past and future generations. Words like "piety" and "religion" did not refer to what you did in your quiet time, but were more like the seemingly obsolete values of "duty" and "honor."

C.R. Wiley illustrates these ancient values through the Roman Aeneas, and shows how this founding myth inspired people to things we need. However, he also shows how this myth failed and it was succeeded by a greater myth—the myth of Abraham and His God's war for the cosmos.

 

Plod, don't sprint. Be fruitful like a tree, not efficient like a machine.

In this book, Douglas Wilson both considers the theology behind technology, work, and mission and advice on how to be productive—and to think about productivity—in the digital age.

We should not rush to buy each and every new iPhone or fancy new gadget, but neither should we reject the new technology out of nostalgia for the good ol' days when people worked with their hands or starved. Instead, we are called to see modern technology as wealth and tools that we can use, whether for good or for ill. The key is wisdom and the ability to create the right habits and the regular discipline to use what we have been given.

Ploductivity: n, 1) the practice of plodding away at a pile of work, instead of frantically trying to sprint through it all
2) being stable and graceful, like a buffalo upon the plains, not frantic, like a prairie dog or roadrunner

 

A poetic portrait of faith, futility, and the joy of this mortal life.

In this astoundingly unique book, bestselling author N.D. Wilson reminds each of us that to truly live we must recognize that we are dying. Every second we create more of our past—more decisions, more breathing, more love and more loathing, all of it slides by into the gone as we race to grab at more moments, at more memories made and already fading.

We are all authors, creators of our own pasts, of the books that will be our lives. We stare at the future or obsess about the present, but only the past has been set in stone, and we are the ones setting it. When we race across the wet concrete of time without purpose, without goals, without laughter and love and sacrifice, then we fail in our mortal moment. We race toward our inevitable ends without artistry and without beauty.

All of us must pause and breathe. See the past, see your life as the fruit of providence and thousands of personal narratives. What led to you? You did not choose where to set your feet in time. You choose where to set them next.

Then, we must see the future, not just to stare into the fog of distant years but to see the crystal choices as they race toward us in this sharp foreground we call the present. We stand in the now. God says create. Live. Choose. Shape the past. Etch your life in stone, and what you make will be forever. "

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Collin Barber

Excellent!!!