Fatherhood and Family Bundle

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In the United States, the family is all but dissolved. Marriage is no longer marriage, and legally, the state could take away your children any time they wanted to. Pastor and Author Jared Longshore argues that the church’s neglect of covenantal living has led us to this pass in American society.

While invisible, saving faith in Jesus is the only way to eternal life, modern Americans have neglected the grace that God gives by binding families and churches to Him and to one another.

This means that families, the church, and nations should take responsibility for their people, and not treat them as so many marbles in a box. God has intimately connected us to one another in these bonds, the central bond being covenant.

We must retrieve this doctrine and live faithfully by it if we want to see reform in America.

 

Filled with practical ideas and self-evaluation tools, Father Hunger both encourages and challenges men to “embrace the high calling of fatherhood,” becoming the dads that their families and our culture so desperately need them to be.

Fatherlessness is a “rot that is eating away at the modern soul,” writes Douglas Wilson, and the problem goes far beyond physical absence. “Most of our families are starving for fathers, even if Dad is around, and there’s a huge cost to our children and our society because of it.” Father Hunger takes a thoughtful, timely, richly engaging excursion into our cultural chasm of absentee fatherhood. Blending leading-edge research with incisive analysis and real-life examples, Wilson:

  • Traces a range of societal ills?from poverty and crime to joyless feminism and paternalistic government expansion?to a vacuum of mature masculinity
  • Explains the key differences between asserting paternal authority and reestablishing true spiritual fathering
  • Uncovers the corporate-fulfillment fallacy and other mistaken assumptions that undermine fatherhood
  • Extols the benefits of restoring fruitful fathering, from stronger marriages to greater economic liberty

Filled with practical ideas and self-evaluation tools, Father Hunger both encourages and challenges men to “embrace the high calling of fatherhood,” becoming the dads that their families and our culture so desperately need them to be.

 

As much as it may distress us, our boys are future men.

The Eighth Book in the Family Series

When Theodore Roosevelt taught Sunday school for a time, a boy showed up one Sunday with a black eye. He admitted he had been fighting and on the Lord's Day, too. He told the future president that a bigger boy had been pinching his sister, and so he fought him. TR told him that he had done perfectly right and gave him a dollar. The stodgy vestrymen thought this was a bit much, and so they let their exuberant Sunday school teacher go. What a loss.

In this book, Douglas Wilson discusses how parents can help their sons cultivate true masculinity and become men who are strong and self-sacrificial, just as Christ was. This book is a part of Douglas Wilson's series of books on the family, which has helped many people trying to deal with the everyday messes that come with sinners trying to live under the same roof. This book on raising sons covers issues such as laziness, Christian liberty, school, sports, girls, and proper contempt for the cool.

 

"Train up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old, he will not depart from it." (Prov. 22:6)

The Third Book in the Family Series

God has designed each family to be a culture—with a language, customs, traditions, and countless unspoken assumptions. The culture of the family intimately shapes the children who grow up in it. It is the duty of the father to ensure that the shaping takes place according to biblical wisdom.

Some fathers establish a rebellious culture for their children and bring upon their children the wrath of God, sometimes for generations. Other fathers fail to establish any distinct culture, and outside cultures rush to fill the void.

Through the Messiah, God promised blessings to His people, "their children, and their children's children forever." The norm for faithful members of the covenant is that their children will follow them in faithfulness. The oddity should be children who fall away. Unless we reestablish faithful Christian culture in countless homes, we will never reestablish it anywhere else.

This book is part of Douglas Wilson's series of books on the family, which has helped many people trying to deal with the everyday messes that come with sinners trying to live under the same roof.



“Men were made to rule. They always have and always will. Nothing can change that. Nothing will. It is not a question of whether men will be ruling, but which ones and how.” ~From It's Good to Be a Man

Our modern society has called for us to “smash the patriarchy,” and the church has not done much better.

Instead of telling men how they can hone and refine their aggressive traits, the church has told men that they should aspire to be meek servant-leaders, and when a man shows any signs of independence, he is shown the door.

This leaves most young men lost. They don’t know what to do or how to improve, so they watch Jordan Peterson videos on YouTube to learn how to grow in their masculinity and sense of mission.

In this book, Michael Foster and Bnonn Tennant remind men that their natural aggressive instincts are gifts from God that are meant to be used for the kingdom. Men are supposed to found households, join brotherhoods, and work towards a mission.

It's Good to Be A Man offers men a quick guide to where they are and how they can improve.

God made men to be strong and aggressive risk-takers. This is a feature, not a bug. Foster and Tennant remind us that it’s good to be a man.

A Group Discussion Study Guide for the book is available here , both in print and as a free download.

 

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Chad Pennington

Excellent!