Taboos Are Meant To Be Spoken

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Canon Press

This bundle is hand-picked to help you apocalypse-proof your family. Get yours before it's gone.

Ships as soon as August 11.

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NOTE: If you saw the email for this, you may notice books are missing here. The original bundle sold out, so this bundle was modified to still discuss and understand taboos with biblical wisdom.

 

Get practical, applied wisdom from Scripture to learn how to evict the brain snakes and prideful idols that have invaded the Church.

With this bundle, you'll get:

 

American Milk and Honey

The Jews are our prodigal older brother. When they come home, it will be glory for the world. How should we think of them in the meantime?

Many mistaken Christians have set their hope for the future on a rebuilt Temple in Israel. Others justify their own envy with daydreams of Jewish cabals. But dispensational obsession on the one hand and antisemitic spite on the other aren’t the only options.

In this book, Douglas Wilson calls us to simple, biblical sanity, with clear thinking on Christian/Jewish relations, the Middle East, and the Holocaust, as well as a thorough Reformed theology of the Jews and the Church.

The key to the conversion of the Jews is Christendom. And if American Christians repent of their envy—including antisemitism—the key to Christendom is in their hands.

 

Let the Stones Cry Out

"Architecture speaks. It is not possible for human beings to live in architectural silence. When congregations build church buildings, this is either a testimony or a mask." 

Today we see many magnificent old church buildings abandoned because the Gospel went out of them long ago. However, good architecture and the proclamation of the Gospel should go hand in hand.

Jesus Christ by his death on the cross made the kingdoms of this world His. The architecture of our church buildings should proclaim His lordship.

In Let the Stones Cry Out, Douglas Wilson reflects on what a Christian church should look like, and how human nature wants to get it wrong. A glorious building without the gospel will soon be empty, and an ugly building is lying about the nature of our salvation.

From fundraising to the first Sunday, Douglas Wilson provides much-needed wisdom on how to go about building a church and filling it so as to expand greatly the opportunities for ministry, locally and nationally. After all, worshipping God is not a means to another end. Worshipping God is the highest calling that any human being has. It requires no other justification.

Devoured By Cannabis

A blunt rebuke of high society. 

Many conservatives are ready to give up on fighting against the legalization of marijuana. “Hasn’t the war on drugs been a complete failure?” they ask. And libertarians turn this surrender into a virtue: “People should be free to do what they want, as long as they’re not hurting anyone.” But as Christians, we must be ready to swim against the tide even when it’s no longer cool. (And no, we don’t do it by making unsubstantiated claims about Reefer Madness.)

In Devoured by Cannabis, Douglas Wilson establishes from Scripture that marijuana usage is not comparable to alcohol consumption or to smoking cigarettes, and demonstrates that getting stoned is not an option for believers. Then he explains why keeping marijuana illegal is not a pointless battle but an important cultural watershed for every citizen. When we are deciding which laws are best, wisdom considers not just individual license but also which industries, penalties, and incentives we are putting in place. Liberty for potheads means tyranny for everyone, including the smokers enslaved by the drug.

 

Right Behind

From Jerry Jenkins Himself: "If they're right [the parody author/publisher], then millions of evangelicals are silly and goofy and stupid and are being misled by people with ill motives. If we're that offbase and doing a disservice to the church, it's all that much worse because of how popular our stuff is."

From Mrs. Jenkins: “The bit about the Antichrist getting stuck between the toilet and the tub was crass and tacky. Not funny at all.”

LaHaye and Jenkins' best-selling apocalyptic fiction novel, Left Behind, is already so ridiculous that it's hard to make a parody of it. Yet the conservative Christian author, Nathan Wilson, bravely sets forth to push it over the top. Tweaked versions of all the original characters work together in an absurd tangle of Evangelical goofiness struggling to make sense of the pathetically gnostic vision of the original story. You won't want to miss all body parts, cats, and youth pastors left behind, Buff Williamson's Ivy League deductions, Haddie the Whore of Babylon, or the climactic struggle with the Tulsa Antichrist in a Christian "book store." If you regret reading Left Behind, read Right Behind to ease that pain with laughter.

 

The Mantra of Jabez

Be a kipper for God.

Bruce Wilkinson's best-selling book, The Prayer of Jabez, is so popular with Evangelicals it just had to be bad. Wilkinson told us to be "gimpers" for God; Jones shows us how to be kippers for God. In this parody the conservative Christian author allows humor to reveal the more ridiculous assumptions driving the original book.

Each chapter of the original is turned inside out so that we can really see what's being said. Though the parody is rather ruthless in its humor, it is not hopelessly cynical just for the sake of mockery. It points to a more constructive vision, a vision of Christianity's inherent riches of truth, beauty, and goodness that the original Jabez book passively trivializes. Get this parody for the laughs; get it for something greater.

Confessions of a Food Catholic

You can sin with food in many ways: by not sharing it, by eating way too much of it, or by throwing it across the restaurant table, for example. But you do not sin with food by bowing your head over it, saying grace with true gratitude in your heart, and tucking in.

You can sin with food in many ways—by not sharing it, by eating way too much of it, by throwing it across the restaurant table... But you do not sin with food by bowing your head over it, saying grace with true gratitude in your heart, and tucking in. Sharp-edged but humorous, Confessions of a Food Catholic addresses the unscriptural approach to food that many Christians have developed in recent years. (By the way, a "food catholic" is somebody who accepts all eaters of all foods, even if he or she doesn't actually eat quinoa.) Specifically, the book addresses divisive threats to Christian table fellowship, the know-it-all pride of newfangled "health food" rules, and the dislocated moralism that makes "organic" and "natural" the signs of righteousness while disdaining the brethren who buy their beef at Stuffmart.

 

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Not what I thought...

Originally (from the pictures) I thought it was made in America because of the "Canon Brand Goods" tag and the high price. However, when I received the hat, I noticed the OTHER tag that says made in China. So for an item made in China and the high price...3 stars.

Summer Mablog Full Mesh Hat

Great Book

A great read for anyone who is working out their views on infant baptism and covenant membership. Have given away several copies over the years, and people always find it as compelling as I did the first time I read it. Makes for a bunch of great conversation as well.

J
The Plod Hat
John H.
Solid Hat and Advice

This hat is very well made from high quality materials and beautifully designed. It kept my dome out of the sun all summer, served as a much needed reminder of what I should be doing, and prompted several conversations about why I am plodding instead of hustling.

Excellent

I thought this book was excellent.

Extremely helpful! Very thankful for this Book!

z
The Plod Hat
zachary m.
Love it

Great fit and feel

Best hat ever!

Things just seem to get done when I put this hat on, which is exactly what a man needs from a hat. Couldn’t be happier!

Hat

My husband loves his new hat and wears it often!

J
The Plod Hat
Jeremiah N.

Awesome!

B
The Plod Hat
Brock W.
Plod Hat Plods

The hat is quality material and fits well! My friends and I have been very happy with them!

Father’s Day gift to myself..

I bought this hat as a Father’s Day gift to myself. Great hat, great ministry!

J
The Plod Hat
Johansen B.L.-.J.J.
Great hat!

Good quality meterial & design. As one who loves wearing hats, this is one of my all time favorites.

E
The Plod Hat
Ellie B.
The plod hat

I wear it just as much as my husband. We are “fighting” over who gets to wear it. Great fit for both male and female and I love the logo and the meaning behind it, not just because it’s Doug’s podcast name.

J
The Plod Hat
Josh M.
Quality

Very well built hat, solid quality and a classy logo.
Christian excellence.

A big hit

Fun, well written poetry and sweet story. Beautiful illustrations. Hello Ninja packs it all into a cardboard children’s book. I’m grateful for good books to give my grandson.

Great hat

Breathes excellent. Love the fit and appearance

E
The Plod Hat
Erin S.

The Plod Hat

Perfect Gift

Bought it for my husband who is in Africa right now working hard. He loves it!

We bought the book for our oldest grandson who will be six when he receives it. His dad, our son, told us about it and hoped we would buy it for him. Great artwork and the story will be easy for Josiah to read and it will encourage him to think about his own experience of life so far. He has two younger brothers and a sister on the way so he is the leader of the pack and first example to his siblings of how to do life.

Well written book about how to stop slacking off and get projects done well.

So good!

My son cannot get enough of this book!

Read it Three Times-So Good

When a book gives expression to something you've been wondering about for a long time, you tend to devour it, which is why I read Black & Tan 3x. I haven't found fault with the underlying premises nor the path it takes to conclusions about our American past, including our unwarranted northern superiority complex regarding slavery, residual angst over why only here it took over half a million men's lives to end slavery and the monstrous federal bureaucracy that emerged from all that, leading directly to many of our socio-economic and spiritual problems of today. Will likely read it again and refer to it in the future.

Strangely Bright: Can You Love God and Enjoy This World? (2nd Ed)

Mere Christendom